Doing the Hamlet Act

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In true Remnant fashion, Jonah speaks to Seth Masket – a political scientist at the University of Denver – in an attempt to understand why so few people in American life actually get what they want out of their vote. In Seth’s new book, Learning from Loss, he traces the Democratic Party’s inability to come up with a coherent “autopsy” post-2016 as Republicans did post-2012 (which is not to say that the GOP actually followed its own advice; we wouldn’t have Trump if it did). There’s some debate punditry at the beginning, before Seth and Jonah swiftly move into the explanations that Democratic organizers and activists have developed for why Clinton lost to Trump. The primary explanations often focus on a contentious topic: identity politics. As Seth says, “Doing this research helped to remind me that all identity claims are essentially a construction,” but for something so artificial, they have a very outsized effect on our politics. While Seth and Jonah effectively take opposite sides on this issue, they generate much more light than heat, while also arriving at an answer to the fundamentally important question in 2020: For a party so concerned with diversity, how is it that the Dems ended up nominating a septuagenarian white guy?

Show Notes:

-30-day trial at The Dispatch

-Seth’s new book, Learning from Loss: The Democrats, 2016-2020

-White liberals have moved farther to the left

-Overdetermined phenomena

-Weather’s effect on elections

-The RNC’s 2012 “autopsy”

-The invisible primary

-The Party Decides

-Ashley Jardina’s White Identity Politics

-Breaking the Two-Party Doom Loop

-DrinkHydrant.com/Dingo for 25% off your first order

-Acton.org/Dingo to subscribe to the Acton Line podcast

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (272)

Episode 267 · 1 week ago

Empathizing Past the Graveyard

This weekend’s Ruminant sees Jonah starting off in some classic Remnant Bingo™, but peppered in with a healthy dose of interesting new information on those topics – in this case, anti-Enlightenment nationalism, and the establishment of fair rules under classically liberal societies. This comes along in addition to a rundown of the ham-fisted efforts by many outlets to pretend that “originalism” is actually something much more radical and antediluvian than it really is. Then, Jonah moves on to a topic that our culture could desperately use some clarification on: “Justice” and “social justice” are two different things – and “bending the will of every institution towards social justice … is how you end up with a kind of soft totalitarianism.” And, in this particularly relaxed-fit episode, we even get some rank punditry on the tail end on subjects like the censored New York Post story and much more.

Show Notes:

-Get your tickets now to The Dispatch’s “What’s Next” event

-The most recent G-File

-Against Empathy by Paul Bloom

-Mazie Hirono being weird

-Making fun of originalism to own the cons

-Rod Dreher’s new book, Live Not by Lies

-Rod responds to his Morning Joe appearance

-The Post story in question

-ExpressVPN.com/Remnant to get three months free off of a year-long plan

Episode 266 · 1 week ago

Rutabaga Unicorn

Here we are, in the wreckage of another simply wonderful Supreme Court confirmation hearing; who better to discuss the aftermath, next steps, and what these hearings do to the court than Ilya Shapiro? As Jonah says, Ilya is likely “the guest most consistently asked to make a comeback - mostly by the guest himself,” but it’s easy to see why. In addition to giving the 411 on why these hearings have transformed into so much “senatorial bloviation,” he also can talk about the bigger picture as a result of the research he did for his incredibly timely new book on the politicization of SCOTUS. It has been a long time coming for this return - and much like Ulysses’ journey back from Troy, it was worth the wait.

Show Notes:

-Ilya’s book, Supreme Disorder: Judicial Nominations and the Politics of America's Highest Court

- Ilya in USA Today: End confirmation hearings

-Telefon, mind control scene

-Pete Buttigieg’s 5-5-5 Plan

-Barrett: Roe is not a super-precedent

-Barrett’s article on precedent

-Ginsburg’s history with Roe

-The history of an internecine fight on the right about judicial activism

-Ilya Shapiro on “Team Liberty”

- Shapiro on Shapiro

-Lucy.co, promo code DINGO for 20% off all products

-Bradleyfdn.org/Liberty to hear Trent England on the Electoral College

Episode 265 · 2 weeks ago

Blue Pill or Red Pill

Today, we bring you Will Saletan of Slate – after having struggled mightily against the malevolent whims of technology in order to get it ready. Not since Episode 11 has an installment of The Remnant so risked the sanity – nay, the very essence – of all participants involved. Luckily, the conversation more than makes up for these struggles. Jonah asks Will what it’s like to be a genuinely liberal guy in an industry space that has moved largely past actual liberalism, and then Will turns the tables on Jonah and asks him what it’s like to be genuinely conservative in an era of dwindling conservatism. Afterwards, stick around for SCOTUS punditry and what could be described as a worrying amount of Hegel-talk (for awareness: a worrying amount of Hegel-talk is any Hegel-talk).

Show Notes:

-Will’s page at Slate

-New River Media

-Dallas retcons itself

-Candidate Trump reacts to the crowd while announcing travel ban

-“The 5-5-5 Plan”

-“What I Learned From Amy Coney Barrett,” by Laura Wolk

-Fukuyama’s piece on social capital

-LiquidIV.com, use promo code DINGO at checkout for 25% off anything you order

-Keeps.com/Dingo to receive your first month of treatment for free

Episode 264 · 2 weeks ago

From Court-Packing to Wilson-Bashing

TO OUR FAVORITE PEOPLE IN THE WORLD! Not seniors this time around, but Remnant listeners, that is. Jonah returns to ruminate with some fire in his belly this week – on the wasting of energy on Twitter, the bizarre phenomenon of the mainstream-media respectable conservative, court packing, The Worst President in History™, a revisiting of the weed conversation from the last Remnant, and more. Also, the quote of the day – or maybe the month, or the year – might be this: “The very essence of serious thinking … is the ability to make distinctions between superficially similar things.”

Show Notes:

-This week’s G-File

-Steve Schmidt picks a pointless fight with Matt Lewis and Noah Rothman

-“Respectable Conservatives”

-Brian Morgenstern invokes HIPAA rights when talking about Trump’s negative COVID test

-“A switch in time saves nine”

-“Heil Woodrow,” something of a self-own in review form

-“TO MY FAVORITE PEOPLE!”

-This week’s Remnant with Jonathan Adler

-In case you also wanted to get addicted to a Star Trek

-Bradleyfdn.org/Liberty to subscribe to We the People and listen to Frederick Hess on education policy